adelynlee

Using Social Media + #HootSuite for Conferences and Events

In Community Management, Live Tweet, Social media, Sports Media on July 15, 2014 at 12:13 am

If you find yourself in a university setting or traveling to a conference, it’s likely you’ll end up in a situation with a guest speaker, some important insights you wish you could remember and a hash tag on a flier or program.

As a student or professional, it is often about how to make the most out of those precious 45 minutes with an industry expert or interesting speaker. Social preparation before the event, live tweeting and documentation during, and a reach out and thank you afterwards can be the key to engaging, remembering and creating long-term contact after events.

Prior to the event:

1. Find and follow the speakers on twitter. More than likely, your speaker or they organization they represent will have a social presence.  By getting an idea of the types of content they post and conversation they engage in, you can begin the background research process and have context for the topics they may discuss.

Seat Conference has begun making a list of attendees here.

2. Reach out ahead of time. Considering tweeting or reaching out to those involved with the conference or event ahead of time. Even a casual mention can show your enthusiasm for the topic and make the visitor or speaker feel welcome.  Creating pre-event social buzz can remind and build enthusiasm for an upcoming event. This can be a good thing no matter if it is happening on your campus, at your organization or at a travel location or event center.

2. Reach out ahead of time. Considering tweeting or reaching out to those involved with the conference or event ahead of time. Even a casual mention can show your enthusiasm for the topic and make the visitor or speaker feel welcome.  Creating pre-event social buzz can remind and build enthusiasm for an upcoming event. This can be a good thing no matter if it is happening on your campus, at your organization or at a travel location or event center.

3. Set up a tab or concentrated streams in HootSuite. I have a tab within my HootSuite dashboard titled “events.” In this tab I have a stream of my sent tweets, a stream of my mentions, and a stream with the hash tag for whichever event I am currently attending. It’s also a good idea to set up a stream following mentions of the speaker or event venue to keep an eye on the conversation that is going on around you. From this home plate you can engage with other visitors to the event and create conversation around what is being discussed at the event. This can be a great way to keep up changes to itinerary or news in the days leading up to the event.

During the event:

1. Utilize those tabs! Open up HootSuite on your iPhone, iPad, desktop or whatever other electronic device you choose to use during the event. Keep an eye on the tabs you set up. Be sure to tweet quotes from the event if allowed (with proper attribution of course!) and engage with the speaker and fellow audience members. Many events even use these social streams for questions so keep up with what’s being asked and considering meaningful inquiries of your own.

Post-event:

1. Gratitude and further connections.  Follow up with people that you engaged with during the conference or speaking event. This could mean tweeting out a thanks or DM-ing to keep the conversation going. Be sure to follow them and allow them to be incorporated into your usual HootSuite streams if they were particularly relevant or interesting!

 

2. Keep in touch. Minutes, days, or even a week after the event you may be surprised to see what types of connections you make. If you receive a response from the event be sure to answer and catch up with the connections you’ve made. Building a network of power sharers who contribute regular meaningful content can be an ideal way to get the most out of your social experience.

Have any tips on how you’ve kept in contact with speakers or networked with professionals at industry conferences? No matter what the topic of the conference or speaker, backchannels of engagement can be a manuscript of the event and a way to personally interact in a crowded setting. I’d love to hear your thoughts, feel free to tweet at @adelynlee!

 

 

They say your hobby should be the farthest thing from your occupation…

In lifestyle on July 5, 2014 at 11:23 pm

…And since I spend my days happily clicking, retweeting and most recently coding my way through the digital media realm of hockey, my hobby is something entirely the opposite–Gardening.

Growing up, I was never good at taking care of things. I can’t even tell you how many goldfish accidentally drown on my watch. But when I moved into my new apartment in Florida last October, I decided to try out my green thumb. Probably because Florida’s constant sunshine and wet rains create the ideal climate for plants, my garden didn’t turn out half bad and I’ve really started to enjoy it.

I’m partially embarrassed to become one of “those people” but I made a Pin Board to document my plants and plant care tips.

 

Follow Adelyn’s board Addie’s SoFla Garden on Pinterest.

I’ve had success so far with Basil,

Screen Shot 2014-07-05 at 7.21.15 PM

Jalapeños

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and  Radishes, but unfortunately managed to kill the gorgeous flowers pictured above. Maybe there’s a lesson in there somewhere?

Today I planted my first strawberry plant as well as some chocolate mint! I’m hoping to dry my lavender and chocolate mint and make my own tea.

My garden has taught me two things above all so far: 

1. Do your research– Not that I have’t learned this a million times throughout college, graduate school and life, but for some reason I treated this as less academic and more just “water them everyday right?” But I am finding out it’s not that simple. Florida’s climate makes for a unique year-round growing ground, but it’s still important to see which plants compliment each other and what is the best time of year to plant them.

2. Plants are an amazing allegory for life– Yes, so corny I know. But also, so true. Sometimes all we can do is plant the seeds, provide the water and hope for the best.

#TBT Nostalgia Trend in Social with Google + #HOA

In case studies on April 25, 2014 at 3:52 pm

Since being launched in 2011, Google Plus has offered different amenities than other social networks. One of the most discernable is Google + Hangouts on Air. With the abilty to story board ideas,share screens, talk across oceans and broadcast it all to YouTube in one click, Hangouts on Air offer a unique opportunity for brands to host discussions with their fans and bring them just a little bit closer to day to day operations.

We tested out Hangouts on Air with the members of our PR Staff today to practice back channeling and broadcasting.

Screen Shot 2014-04-25 at 11.53.13 AM

The topic of our broadcast was Nostalgia in Social Media, the #TBT trend, timehop and first tweets.

Here’s what we learned:

 

1. Planning and Prep: As you can see, a script or run of show is a very helpful too–that we did not utilize. While the purposes of our hangout was just to familiarize everyone with the functions, having a run down or a scripted introduction is key. Secondly, it’s a good idea to have a list of your video invitees and include where in the “run of show” they will be invited and introduced. It’s not a bad idea to have a pre-conversation with these people about what they can and cannot ask of the show’s guest or say about the predetermined topic.

2. Screen Shares: Screen Shares can help you explain or display something relevant to your conversation. Have the screen up easily and make sure there’s no struggle to toggle.

3. Twitter as a BackChannel: Our Marketing team, ahem, was preoccupied and we weren’t looking for general audience questions so we struggled at the audience interaction part. Because G+ maybe be unfamiliar to the masses, a good way to take questions and comments is a Twitter backchannel. One member of your team can monitor the Hashtag of your conversation on HootSuite and allow for real-time interactions. The key to this is promoting ahead of time where and when to be.

4. Toggle to Talk: The host of the hangout is in control of what is seen on the main screen. Always be aware of what the main focus is by choosing the person speaking with the blue box. If this is forgotten (As you can see happens above for a screen share) it can make the hangout difficult and confusing.

 

Still open to tips & working on improving our hangout skills! Anyone have anything to share?

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